Book Hippo Featured Author

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

On Facebook:



Hello Miss Quinn. I'm sure you get a million messages like this, but I wanted to say thank you. Your books have changed my life. I've always felt like women were treated so unfairly, but everyone around me disagreed, even the women. It frustrated me so much. After I read your books, I directed everyone I knew to them and several people read them. It got them thinking so we could actually have a real conversation about women's status in society and how to uplift ourselves. It's so refreshing when you find someone who feels the same way you do about things. I started following you on Facebook not long after I finished the second Gold Stone Girl book and realized that you're a soul sister. I appreciate all you do for women and the environment and am very excited about the third book. Thank you.

Monday, May 18, 2015

It's a Nightmare - NIEA Finalist!




Congratulations!

It is our great pleasure to inform you that you are a Finalist in the 9th Annual National Indie Excellence Awards. Your book truly embodies the excellence that this award was created to celebrate, and we salute you and your fine work.

The lists of winners and finalists will be highlighted on our website. Please go to www.indieexcellence.com to see your name and book cover among those of the other proud winners and finalists.

The entire team at the National Indie Excellence Awards sincerely hope your participation in our contest will serve you well in the your ongoing success. You have our deepest congratulations.

Warmly,

Ellen Reid
President & CEO
National Indie Excellence Awards

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Nicole Quinn reads from It's a Nightmare


May 8, 2015 - 7:00pm -8:00pm

Inquiring Minds Bookstore ( 6 Church Street, New Paltz) will host author Nicole Quinn. She will read from and sign, It's a Nightmare, the latest novel in her Gold Stone Girl series.  The book has just been nominated for a Tiptree Award, an honor recognizing speculative fiction that changes the way we think about gender. Nicole Quinn has written scripts for HBO, Showtime, and network television. Her feature film, RACING DAYLIGHT, (starring Academy Award winner Melissa Leo and Emmy winner David Strathairn), is streaming everywhere. Her plays are published by Playscripts, Inc. In 2011 she won the Harper Audio contest to read on Neil Gaiman's 10th anniversary full cast audiobook American Gods. She now has many audiobooks to her credit.
845 255-8300

Monday, April 13, 2015

The Page 69 Challenge


Turn to page 69 of any book and read it. If you like that page, buy the book.
That was Marshall McLuhan’s advice anyway. Barb Taub invites readers to submit their own or other works (pg. 69 only of course!)
http://barbtaub.com/2015/04/13/page-69-challenge-excerpts-from-leaning-into-love-memoir-and-its-a-nightmare-dystopian-feminist-fantasy-fiction/

It’s a Nightmare (The Gold Stone Girl, Book 1) by Nicole Quinn

Genre: Dystopian feminist fantasy fiction
Its A Nightmare cover Nicole QuinnMina, a rogue DreamWeaver, is born in the Off-grid of the Night Mare’s Winkin City, a world, where human females are kept as cattle, and licensed as domestic pets. She’s found inside a willow tree, alongside lygaeidae hibernating as larva. Mina lives the life of a human-breeder, who discovers that in order to survive, she must change everything.

Page 69 (BlueBarnProductions, May 11, 2014)
The voice inside my head pipes up, Pilar was raised as cattle, always intended for trade or sale. Stooped Helga has survived three owners already, while Chinaka’s people want the evil spirit beaten out of her, before they’ll accept back. Soo doesn’t talk, so she’s never heard. You have known humanity.
Day after day we sit on our cushions in yurt #13, watching Pater Dick strut his
lessons. In the winter, it’s freezing. The Pater’s meager government allotment of wood he reserves for his personal use, while he sends us out, harnessed together like a pack of hounds, to hunt for felled branches. In the summer, it’s sweltering, both inside and out.
Nicole Quinn is a WGA writer.  Her feature film Racing Daylight (writer/dir) stars Academy Award winner Melissa Leo and Emmy winner David Strathairn, and it's streaming everywhere.   Nicole won the Harper Audio contest to read on Neil Gaiman's American Gods.  She has produced a dozen audiobooks and narrated as many,  It's a Nightmare, The Gold Stone Girl, book 1, has been nominated for a Tiptree Award.
Nicole Quinn is a WGA writer. Her feature film Racing Daylight (writer/dir) stars Academy Award winner Melissa Leo and Emmy winner David Strathairn, and it’s streaming everywhere.
Nicole won the Harper Audio contest to read on Neil Gaiman’s American Gods. She has produced a dozen AUDIOBOOKSand narrated as many, It’s a Nightmare, The Gold Stone Girl, book 1, has been nominated for a Tiptree Award.
“The three stones you choose at Registration are the predictors of your behavior. What we will expect of you. Gold, silver, vermillion, yellow, blue, grey, scarlet, green, pink, and white. Each color has a meaning, to help us identify and weed out the trouble makers early. To understand which of you deserve preferment as pets, and perhaps as media.” He looks around at the five of us.
“No, I guess not.” He says with a snort. Pater’s Dick’s feet stop in front of me. I don’t look up. After a pointed pause, he moves on.
“The most sought after stone, of course, is the gold, which trumps all other stones in its value to society. There is no greater honor for a breeder than to pull the gold stone.
That lucky girl gives her life to the Night Mare, in reparation for our sins.
“The most recent gold stone pulled, however, was a fake. Several hundred cycles back,” Dick tells us.

Sounds good? Get more information or your copy of It’s A Nightmare from:

I would really love to feature your Page 69! Use Contact Form here to submit your favorite Pg 69 (your own or other’s work) 

Monday, April 6, 2015

Against Type: Rewriting the She-Ro





http://www.rewritingmarysue.com/rms/rewritingtheshero

April 5, 2015
When I discovered that baby girls were being thrown away, I needed to write about it.  I wanted to understand a society where that could happen, where females were complicit, where it was of the culture.  To venture so far into the dark, I needed hope, and someone to embody it.  I needed her to be someone I would want to follow from fear and darkness, into the light. 

Mina, the protagonist of my epic trilogy, is a rogue Dream Weaver, recast in the Night Mare’s government-church dogma as, The Gold Stone Girl.  She’s the human sacrifice the Night Mare, the demon ruler of the world, must consume to renew the planet, and herself.  It’s not a light burden. 
In characterizing her, I wondered what decisions I might make in a restrictive society. What if I could be boiled in oil by a drug lord, or tortured to change my religion?  Have acid thrown in my face for being too enticing, or too confident.  A bullet put into my head for going to school?  What if rape were a common occurrence when I had to forage for food and kindling, or if I walk alone at night, or if I let a guy buy me dinner?  What if girl babies were put to death as an everyday matter of course all around me?  What if my labia and clitoris were removed just before puberty, as a cultural tradition? What might I sublimate of my own will just to live?  This is the world I gave Mina to survive.  
Mina is found inside a tree, and raised by outsiders, Off-gridders, which allows us all to get to know the Night Mare’s horror from a distance, at least in the beginning.  Then I gave Mina the task of having to save the whole world, in order to save herself.  Ultimately everyone has a stake in her success, or failure, even the Night Mare
Mina’s a reluctant hero who slips through the cracks of the Night Mare’s system, a system set up specifically to find her.  She wants to be normal, like everyone else, except for being owned, and abused.  So in order to find a new normal, Mina has to undertake the extraordinary, she has to discover who she is, from inside herself, as all record of her legend has been expunged by her enemy.  

I wanted to create the type of confident woman I’d long admired in novels about housekeeping, Jane Austen heroines, and such.  Women who aspired to lives that were not allowed to them.  Even if the perceived stakes weren’t high, will I marry on my own terms, in partnership, in love, or will I not marry at all, in a world where marrying meant you were property, and, not to, meant spinsterhood, financial ruin, and familial shame.  It was a time when widowhood was the only state in which a woman could own her own life, though not always her own property if it was entailed away to the next male in the family line.
I didn’t want Mina to be the she-male of gamers and graphic novels, hyper-sexualized and hyper-violent, something to be caged and tamed, before she’s killed.  I wanted someone less two dimensional.  Someone flawed, who makes mistakes and grows from them.  I wanted her to understand how to physically defend herself, and others.  I wanted her to know how to survive the planet. What doesn’t kill her does make her stronger, but in her heart she's flight, not fight.
Mina’s greatest gift is in her ability to separate her own self-worth, from the stereotypes by which all females on the planet Blinkin are prescribed by law.  Mina’s journey is to turn a perceived weakness, her ability to dream, into the basis of her strength and confidence.  Mina’s magic is belief in herself.  She doesn't dream of rescue, she dreams of rescuing herself.

Nicole Quinn is a WGA writer.  She's written scripts for HBO, Showtime, and network television. Her feature film, RACING DAYLIGHT, (starring Academy Award winner Melissa Leo and Emmy winner David Strathairn), is streaming everywhere. She won the Harper Audio contest to read on Neil Gaiman's 10th anniversary full cast audiobook American Gods. She has produced a dozen audiobooks and narrated as many. Her plays are published by Playscripts, Inc.


Are you a writer, like Nicole Quinn, with female characters who defy tropes and overturn expectations? Why not submit your own essay to us? We would love to hear how your #UnabridgedWomen characters are rewriting stereotypes!

Saturday, March 28, 2015

Why Do We Fight Aging?




I’m almost sixty.  It’s a year away, so I figured I should give the age some thought.  Amazing, is the word that comes to mind. I have some gray in my hair, and some lines on my face that I’m pleased to see deepen when I smile.  All about me is older than it was when I was twenty-nine, thirty-nine, and so on, you get the idea.  Everyday, in the media, I’m told about the many ways I can look younger, thinner, chicer, as if there is something inherently wrong with the natural process by which we age, and as if I have nothing else to do but groom.  I submit to the media that maintaining this ethos of fear is very good for sales.  Smoke and mirrors keep us from looking at what’s really important.

When I was young and supple my biology told me to find the best match I could, and it insisted that I procreate, to further my genetic line.  It’s just nature, which I was allowed to reason with critical thought, and then act on, or not.  It was my choice. 

I would not be that younger self again, been there, done that.  There are so many new chapters left to write.  My children would be an experience yet to come, and not the inspiring adults, whom I love and admire, and who have lives of their own.  

But it’s that fertile moment in time, when our bodies want to biologically showcase themselves for a mate, that has been engineered, by the corporations, into a lifelong quest.  Why should a woman of sixty look as if she were still trying to procreate, when what she wants is to live her life, looking at the world, and not into a mirror?  I want a life which includes good food, sex, comfortable clothes, and flat shoes.    

Why do we not celebrate the contour of the sag as a badge of honor, as a right of passage, as heroic?  Why do we want to look as if we haven't lived at all? Why is the look of starvation, visible bones, a turn sideways and disappear aesthetic, considered perfection?   While real starvation is only on view as politics, lest we make the negative comparison on our own, and enlightenment ruin a well oiled marketing machine.  

Corporations want us to be consumed with the amount of hair that sprouts on our bodies, as they supply us with so many ways to remove it, while never mentioning its value as healthy protection.  I challenge the corporations to really market to women.  Have your designer mafia create masterpieces for bodies that don’t look like boys with boobs.  Give us what we want, instead of telling us what we want. 

In the end, I’d rather wait it out in a hole that fits me, my grey hairs, my round hips, and my sagging boobs, than try to smash myself into someone else's square peg.